In March of 2015, the Midwestern History Association launched Studies in Midwestern History to create a space for commentary about the field of Midwestern history. The purpose of the journal is to reach a broader audience; thus, we consider a broad range of submissions, from shorter "think pieces" and essays to traditional academic articles. Studies is particularly interested in studying the institutions, practices, and historiography that constitute the world of Midwestern studies. The journal endeavors to involve emerging graduate students in the process of journal editing and to create a forum in which to publish their work. Its online format allows for more timely publication of scholarship in order to more quickly advance discussion and debate among the many (and sometimes competing) voices in the field.  More generally, the purpose of Studies is to advance the Midwestern History Association’s goal of offering a platform to scholars and graduate students and other commentators who want to more actively participate in the conversation surrounding the revival of Midwestern history. The design and format of Studies is consciously modeled on the original Mississippi Valley Historical Review, the journal launched by the Mississippi Valley Historical Association. The MVHA was first created in 1907 to give historians in the Midwest a voice in the American historical profession. 

If you are interested in submitting a manuscript to Studies for consideration, contact Associate Editors Paul Putz at Paul_Putz@baylor.edu or Michael Skaggs at mskaggs@nd.edu. Submissions should follow these guidelines. While a wide variety of manuscripts are welcome, please see previous issues of Studies for general examples.

Dr. Jon K. Lauck, General Editor

Paul Putz, Associate Editor                                                             Michael Skaggs, Associate Editor


Studies in Midwestern History, Volume 3 (2017)

Jon K. Lauck, "Trump and the Midwest: The 2016 Presidential Election and the Avenues of Midwestern Historiography," Vol. 3 No. 1, January 2017. 

Studies in Midwestern History, Volume 2 (2016)

Jon K. Lauck, "The Origins and Progress of the Midwestern History Association, 2013-2016," Vol. 2 No. 11, October 2016.

Jeffrey Bourdon, "'Just Call Me Bill': William Taft Brings Spectacle Politics to the Midwest," Vol. 2 No. 10, October 2016.

James N. Giglio, "A History of the Missouri Conference on History, 1959-2016," Vol. 2 No. 9, September 2016.

Mark Vinz, "Escaping Cupcake Land," Vol. 2 No. 8, September 2016.

Mark Friedberger, "From Sandhurst to Rural Iowa: The Education of a Prairie Historian," Vol. 2 No. 7, August 2016.

John E. Miller, "The Funeral of Beloved Hoosier Poet, James Whitcomb Riley," Vol. 2 No. 6, July 2016.

David M. Grabitske and David J. Nichols III, "Materially Strengthened: The Minnesota Historical Society and Providing Field Services," Vol. 2 No. 5, May 2016.

Phillip J. Obermiller and Thomas E. Wagner, " 'If the situation seemed insurmountable, I always wanted to be there': Virginia Coffey, A Midwest Human Relations Pioneer," Vol. 2 No. 4, February 2016.

Mark Vinz, "Writing with A Chip on Your Shoulder: Some Notes on Regionalism," Vol. 2 No. 3, February 2016.

Oliver B. Pollak with Harl A. Dalstrom, "Omaha's Missouri Valley History Conference, 1958-2009: An Intellectual History," Vol. 2 No. 2, January 2016.

Theodore J. Karamanski, "A Catholic History of the Heartland: The Rise and Fall of Mid-America: A Historical Review," Vol. 2 No. 1, January 2016.

Studies in Midwestern History, Volume 1 (2015)

James N. Giglio, "A History of the Mid-America Conference on History," Vol. 1 No. 10, December 2015

David M. Fahey, "The Rise and Fall of a Midwestern Studies Journal: The Old Northwest, 1975-1992," Vol. 1 No. 9, December 2015

William Lass, "Historical Sketches of the Northern Great Plains History Conference, 1966-2015," Vol. 1 No. 8, October 2015

Douglas Slaybaugh, "'[It] Made Me Want to Rush Out and Take an Antiseptic Bath': Frances Cochran and the Dilemmas of Social Work in Progressive Era Cincinnati," Vol. 1 No. 7, September 2015

Brad Tennant, "Where The Midwest Ends and The Great Plains Begin," Vol. 1 No. 6, June 2015

Kevin Koch, "Chasing Black Hawk," Vol. 1 No. 5, June 2015

Lawrence H. Larsen, Barbara Cottrell Larsen, "Wisconsin's Disaggregated Development and the Study of the Midwest," Vol. 1 No. 4, May 2015

Mark Vinz, "Our Midwests," Vol. 1 No. 3, April 2015

Frederick E. Witzig, "The Perils and Promise of Midwestern Studies," Vol. 1 No. 2, March 2015

John E. Miller, "Centrifugal and Centripetal Forces Shaping the American Midwest," Vol. 1 No. 1, March 2015.